My musings.

And a lot of gpoc.

104,330 notes

tiarasofspanishmoss:

I think one of the hardest things about being a child whose a father who was in and out of prison was the judgment of other authority figures/adults. Not only did people go on and on with simplistic messages about how people end up in prison, they also told us to our faces that our family problems, our troubles in school and more were all the result of “a culture of failure” and (most of) our parents being unmarried. It was hard enough being taught to build a relationship with my father over prison visits and letters, but the way we were taught to view our families and ourselves because of generational incarceration was dangerous.

(Source: sandandglass, via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

814 notes

We’ve made loans to about a dozen microbrewers and provided coaching to another 30. They are a lot of fun. For me personally, and for us as a company, it connects us with our small-business roots. And if one of these companies is successful enough that they take some market share from us, well, more power to them. I don’t worry about that. I worry about how we create a beer culture that respects the art of brewing and wants beer with flavor, taste, and authenticity. If we can create that environment, there will be plenty of business for all of us.
Samuel Adams founder and chairman Ed Koch (via ericmortensen)

(via evangotlib)

1,363 notes

todayinhistory:

July 11th 1960: To Kill a Mockingbird published

On this day in 1960, the novel ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ by Harper Lee was published by J.B Lippincott & Co. The novel tells the story of the trial of a young African-American man in Alabama in the 1930s, and is told from the perspective of the daughter of the defendant’s lawyer, Scout Finch. Lee was partly inspired by events she recalled from her own childhood growing up in Alabama in the days of Jim Crow segregation. ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ was released during a turbulent time for American race relations, as the burgeoning Civil Rights Movement was beginning to get underway with sit-ins and Freedom Rides in the wake of the Supreme Court ruling Brown v. Board of Education (1954). The novel was originally going to be called ‘Atticus’ for Scout’s father and the moral centre of the story, but was renamed for one of Atticus’s iconic lines. The novel was an immediate success, and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1961. In 1962 it was adapted into an Oscar-winning film starring Gregory Peck and featuring the film debut of Robert Duvall as the elusive Boo Radley. Harper Lee never published another novel and remains reclusive from the press, though she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2007. The influence of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ has never faded in the 54 years since its release, and is a favourite of many for its warmth and humour while tackling some of the most troubling issues of its day.

"Shoot all the blue jays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird"

(via laughterkey)

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We’re opinionated homosexuals. Your days are busy. In the morning you’re going to a sympathetic tech blog to defend yourself from charges of sexual assault; in the afternoon you’re explaining to your board why it’s fine that you’re dating a direct report in your organization. Well, you should stop doing all that, but at least you should stop doing that while looking like a fucking putz. That’s where we come in. We’re the gays of Shirterate. And we’re the first startup with a target audience of rich straight men. (Haha, JK, we’re not the first, we’re just the first to say it.)

It’s Time, Bro.

I don’t know if this is real or fake but it’s probably the best thing on the internet right now.

(via evangotlib)

(via evangotlib)